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It’s never been easier to buy shrooms in Canada, which is precisely what millions are doing right now. Shroom dispensary networks are popping all over the place, triggering a spike in the popularity of microdosing.

Microdosing psilocybin has been linked with a long list of potential benefits, far beyond the obvious enjoyment of recreational psychedelics.

But despite the growing popularity of microdosing in Canada, the whole subject of magic mushrooms remains shrouded in misinformation. Myths and untruths about the ‘risks’ of microdosing continue to perpetuate, causing issues for those interested in trying magic mushrooms in Canada.

To help dispel a few of these untruths, we’ll now be taking a look at several longstanding magic mushroom myths and the truths behind them:

Myth 1: Magic mushrooms are addictive

First up, research suggests that psychedelics like magic mushrooms are no more addictive than coffee, chocolate or any other everyday indulgence. In fact, there’s growing evidence to suggest that psychedelics can actually be helpful in combating various types of addictions.

Realistically, you’re actually more likely to develop a detrimental cellphone addiction then find yourself addicted to magic mushrooms. The latter being almost completely out of the question, when they’re consumed sensibly and in moderation.

Some people are naturally more prone to dependencies or addictive behaviors than others – something to take into account when self-medicating with anything at all.

Myth 2: Psychedelics can make you go crazy

Is it possible to behave in an irrational manner and put yourself in harm’s way while under the influence of psychedelics? The short answer is yes – as is the case with all intoxicants across the board. However, when it comes to the matter of magic mushrooms having the capacity to make you ‘go crazy’ longer-term, there’s no evidence to suggest such a risk whatsoever.

The results of an extensive study carried out in 2015 found absolutely no connection between the regular use of psychedelics and the respective individual’s risk of developing severe mental health issues.

Still, this doesn’t mean it is a good idea to throw caution to the wind and chow-down on hardcore psychedelics in gargantuan quantities. Again, common sense and moderation hold the key to staying safe and enjoying magic mushrooms – all as part of a healthy lifestyle.

Myth 3: Psilocybin Stays in Your Body Long-Term

There’s a curious myth doing the rounds which suggests that not only does psilocybin stay in your body permanently, but in doing so can also cause you to experience a permanent psychedelic trip. A theory that doesn’t hold even a modicum of logic, when considered from a common-sense perspective.

For one thing, the half-life of potent hallucinogens varies from around 3 to 5 hours. This means that at least 50% of the substance will have been eliminated from the body at this point, by way of its natural detoxification processes. A few more hours and the vast majority of the substance has been banished, along with its psychedelic effects.

In terms of trace-amount detection, it is possible for minute quantities of psychedelic agents to be detected in the body a few days after they were last used. Though not nearly on the same level as cannabis, which can be detected up to a month after it was last used.

What this means is that within a matter of hours, psilocybin is naturally expelled from the body and no longer has a psychedelic effect. Even if it stuck around longer, it would be scientifically impossible for it to trigger a continuous psychedelic trip for such an extensive duration.

Myth 4: Magic Mushrooms Are Toxic and Therefore Dangerous

Next time somebody brings this argument up in conversation, feel free to ask them exactly how many people have died as a direct result of consuming magic mushrooms. The answer – only one fatality has been recorded within the last two decades, which experts summarily linked to the deceased individual’s various underlying health conditions.

The simple fact of the matter is that magic mushrooms are widely regarded as the safest drug on the face of the earth. In terms of toxicity, psychedelics like psilocybin pose a lower risk than Viagra, painkillers, whisky and even salt.

Though it is not completely impossible to do yourself damage by ingesting too much psilocybin, permanent harm and fatal toxicity are more or less out of the question. Hence, it is irrational, unreasonable and irresponsible to label magic mushrooms as toxic or dangerous.

Myth 5: Psychedelics like magic mushrooms are gateway drugs

Last but not least, it’s been theorized for generations that drugs like cannabis and magic mushrooms are harmful ‘gateway’ drugs to avoid. Gateway drugs are those that effectively pave the way for more dangerous drug use – i.e. you start out by taking psilocybin and eventually graduate to cocaine, heroin and so on.

Once again, it is a theory that is based entirely on unfair assumptions and has no scientific backing whatsoever. Extensive studies have shown that those who use psilocybin and cannabis are no likelier to graduate to harder drugs than anyone else.

In fact, psilocybin has been linked with elevated success rates among those who use psychedelics to help them combat addiction to other drugs. From smoking cessation to easing off on prescription painkiller intake, psychedelics can be surprisingly effective when working to combat addiction.